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Media documenting Asian Americans living in the Austin metro area.

Photos documenting Austin Public Library branches from the Austin Files collection

Media documenting agriculture in the Austin metro area.

Media documenting animals in Austin and surrounding areas

Illustrations of Austin and surrounding areas

Media documenting bridges in the Austin metro area

Media documenting Camp Mabrya military installation in Austin, Texas that houses the headquarters of the Texas Military Department, Texas Military Forces and Texas Military Forces Museum

Media documenting the Texas State Capitol

Media documenting courthouses in Austin and Travis County

Media documenting creeks in Austin and surrounding areas

Photos and videos documenting African Americans in Austin and Travis County from the Austin Files collection

Media documenting public schools in the Austin metro area

Media documenting the recreation centers in the Austin metro area

Media documenting bars in the Austin metro area

Media documenting streetcars and street railway companies in Austin, Texas

Media documenting streets in Austin, Texas

Media documenting various subdivisions in the Austin metro area

Media documenting performing arts venues in Austin, Texas

Media documenting the history of University of Texas athletics

Media documenting buildings on the campus of the University of Texas at Austin

Media documenting the various housing for students of the University of Texas at Austin

Media documenting dams in the Austin metro area

Media documenting diseases from sources Austin, Texas

Media documenting the history of the Austin Fire Department

Media documenting the Texas Governor's Mansion in Austin, Texas

Media documenting Texas highways in the Austin metro area

Media documenting hotels and taverns in the Austin metro area

MMedia documenting Huston Tillotson a private historically black university in Austin, Texas. Established in 1875, Huston–Tillotson University was the first institution of higher learning in Austin. The university is affiliated with the United Methodist Church, the United Church of Christ, and the United Negro College Fund.

Media documenting movie theaters in the Austin metro area

Media documenting the municipal airport in Austin, Texas

Media documenting music festivals in Austin, Texas

Media documenting music venues in the Austin metro area

Media documenting the Music Train in Austin, Texas

Media documenting community centers in the Austin metro area

Media documenting parks in the Austin metro area

Media documenting the City of Austin Parks and Recreation Department

Media documenting the Austin Police Department

Media documenting protests and demonstrations in the Austin metro area

Photos documenting Baptist churches in Austin and Travis County from the Austin Files collection

Photos that document Bergstrom Air Force Base from the Austin Files collection. Bergstrom Air Force Base (1942–1993) was a United States Air Force base located seven miles (11 km) southeast of downtown Austin, Texas. It was activated during World War II as a troop carrier training airfield, and was a front-line Strategic Air Command (SAC) base during the Cold War. In its later years, it was transferred to the Tactical Air Command (TAC) and became a major base for the U.S. Air Force's RF-4C reconnaissance fighter fleet. At the time of its closure, it was assigned to the Air Combat Command (ACC).

Photos documenting the Austin Aqua Festival (known as Aqua Fest) was a ten-day festival held the first week of August on the shores of Town Lake (now Lady Bird Lake) in Austin, Texas from 1962 until 1998 from the Austin Files collection

Photos related to aeronautics in Austin, Texas from the Austin Files collection

Media documenting various weather events in the Austin metro area

Media documenting women in Austin and Travis County

Media documenting Zilker Park in Austin, Texas from the Austin Files collection

Media documenting Barton Springs located in Zilker Park from the Austin Files collection

Media depicting art at the Texas State Capitol building and grounds

Media documenting barbershops and barbers in Austin, Texas

Media documenting boats and boating in Austin, Texas

Photographs documenting suppliers of building materials from the Austin Files collection

Photographs documenting boots and shoes from the Austin Files collection

Photographs documenting booksellers and books from the Austin Files collection

Media documenting the Civil Rights era of the 1960s in Austin, Texas from the Austin Files collection

Media documenting carnivals, circuses, and other amusements in Austin, Texas from the Austin Files collection

Media documenting the Texas State Capitol grounds from the Austin Files collection

Photographs documenting Austin area drugstores from the Austin Files collection

Media documenting ecology in the Austin and Travis County from the Austin Files collection

Media documenting public school board members from the Austin Files collection

Media documenting segregation in Austin, Texas from the Austin Files collection

Photographs documenting the Woman Suffrage movement in Austin, Texas from the Austin Files collection

Media documenting the Treaty Oak in Austin, Texas from the Austin Files collection. The Treaty Oak is a Texas live oak tree in Austin, Texas, United States, and the last surviving member of the Council Oaks, a grove of 14 trees that served as a sacred meeting place for Comanche and Tonkawa tribes prior to European settlement of the region.

Photographs documenting the history of radio in Austin, Texas from the Austin Files collection

Media documenting cemeteries in the Austin and Travis County region from the Austin Files collection

Media documenting holiday celebrations from the Austin Files collection

Media documenting shopping centers from the Austin Files collection

Media documenting wildflowers from the Austin Files collection

Photographs documenting the YMCA in Austin, Texas from the Austin Files collection

Photographs documenting the rural schools located in Travis County from the Austin Files collection

Photographs documenting archaeology in Austin, Texas from the Austin Files collection

Media documenting automobiles in Austin, Texas from the Austin Files collection

Media documenting automobile races and drivers from the Austin Files collection

Media documenting Austin bakeries from the Austin Files collection

Photographs documenting dairying from the Austin Files collection.

Media documenting baseball and baseball players from the Austin Files collection

Photographs documenting public welfare from the Austin Files collection

Photographs of railroads from the Austin Files collection

Photographs documenting automobile service stations from the Austin Files collection

Media documenting Chamber of Commerce organizations from the Austin Files collection

Photographs documenting the Chautauqua Grounds located in Georgetown, Texas from the Austin Files collection. The grounds were the home of the Texas Chautauqua Assembly. In 1888, local citizens of Georgetown sought and won the right to become the home of the Texas Chautauqua Assembly. This was an effort to enhance its intellectual and cultural image. The person who brought the idea to Georgetown was the Reverend C.C. Armstrong of Austin, then president of the Texas Chautauqua Assembly.

Photographs documenting children from the Austin Files collection

Photographs documenting motorcycles and cycling from the Austin Files collection

Media documenting churches in the Austin metro area from the Austin Files collection

Photographs documenting church-run schools from the Austin Files collection

Photographs documenting Catholic churches from the Austin Files collection

Photographs documenting the Millet Opera House from the Austin Files collection. The Millett Opera House, at 110 East Ninth Street, has been the home of The Austin Club since 1981. Built by city father Captain Charles F. Millett in 1878, the building was designed by leading architect Frederick E. Ruffini. When completed, the opera house was second in size and grandeur only to the Galveston Opera House. It had 800 moveable seats, balcony, private boxes and an exquisite hand-painted ceiling, a portion of which now hangs in the club’s House Conference Room. The Opera House had programs ranging from medicine shows to legislative sessions while the new Capitol was being constructed. It also hosted church services, political conventions, graduations, dances and recitals, as well as opera and theater productions. Notables who performed in front of its kerosene footlights include John L. Sullivan, Williams Jennings Bryan, John Phillip Sousa, Lily Langtry, Joseph Jefferson, James O’Neill and John Wilkes Booth’s brother, Edwin. In 1896 the building was converted to a skating rink and household storage space. Subsequent owners included the Knights of Columbus, who added the front portico in 1911. In 1940 the Austin Public Free Schools purchased the property. It was threatened with destruction in 1956 but survived when a prominent printing and office supply company took out a long term lease and restored much of the first floor.

Photographs documenting flags, seals, and emblems from the Austin Files collection

Photographs and media documenting the Texas School for the Deaf from the Austin Files collection. The Texas School for the Deaf ’s campus in Austin is older than the State Capitol just up Congress Avenue. Founded in 1856 by the Sixth Legislature, the Texas School for the Deaf is the oldest continuously operating public school in Texas. The school, then called Texas Deaf and Dumb Asylum, was appropriated $10,000 for the biennium. The current 67.5-acre site on South Congress Avenue is the site of the original campus. TSD has been through a number of dramatic changes over the years. Significant historical events include the establishment of a state printing office at the school in 1876, the first ten-year course of study for graduation in 1887 and the construction of a new vocational and education building in 1900. The school’s enrollment and building projects continued to grow from 1900 to 1945. During this time, science and library facilities were built and the number of teachers increased from 14 to 44. Today, the school’s printing is done on an industry standard state of the art digital printer. Student curricula has also expanded to include web design, digital animation and graphics. The school’s historic Lone Star magazine is printed at TSD by students. In 1949, the School was placed under the newly created Board for Texas State Hospitals and Special Schools, and the official name of the School was changed to the Texas School for the Deaf. In 1951, after almost a century of effort to identify TSD as an educational institution, the Legislature directed that the State Board of Education would govern the schools. In 1965, the state schools for the blind and the deaf were combined under a Directors of Special Schools for the State of Texas. Also in 1965, the Texas Deaf and Blind and Orphan School for Colored Youths on Airport Boulevard integrated its students with the special schools. This facility became TSD’s East Campus, which was occupied by TSD students through the 2000-2001 school year, when it was sold to the City of Austin. Regional Day Schools Established. In 1973, Senate Bill 803 established the Regional Day Programs for the Deaf in Texas. These programs were under the Texas Education Agency and were designed to serve deaf and hard of hearing students within local public school districts. In 1979, the Legislature transferred the responsibility of governing TSD from the State Board of Education to a nine-member Board of Trustees appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. The Board was directed to organize and conduct itself like an independent school district board of trustees. The TSD Board must consist of 51% deaf individuals and include parents, alumni and professionals in deafness. Today, the Board and the Superintendent of TSD are a cohesive leadership team. In the late 1980’s, a decision was made to consolidate TSD’s two campuses and a plan to design 458,000 square feet of new construction began. From 1990 to present, TSD has been engaged in a major facility construction plan. One reason for the $65-million dollar appropriation by the state Legislature was a sense that the School for the Deaf facilities were both outdated and inefficient. Another reason was the hope that consolidating the campuses would save money—one campus would need one health center instead of two, one security department, one maintenance department, and one cafeteria. Barnes Architects of Austin was hired to design the campus, and in 1999, their design was one of five top winning designs in the state.

Photographs documenting the Texas School for the Blind from the Austin Files collection. The Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired was established in Austin by the Sixth Texas Legislature on August 16, 1856, as the Asylum for the Blind, with five members of the board of trustees appointed by Gov. Elisha M. Pease. The first location of the school was the leased residence of Mr. W. L. Hill, west of the University of Texas on San Gabriel Street. That location is now the site of the Neill-Cochran House Museum. Dr. S. W. Baker, family doctor and close personal friend of Governor Pease, was the first superintendent. By 1857, three students were in attendance. Parents of the students paid tuition and expenses, but as needed, the tuition and expenses of the students were met by the school. The second location of the school was Block 71 of the area long known as Little Campus, now Heman Sweatt Campus, at the University of Texas. The main school building is now known as the Arno Nowotny Building. The cost of the new facilities was $12,390.00 and was completed in late 1857. In 1905 the legislature changed the name to Blind Institute, and in 1915 the name Texas School for the Blind was adopted. White, including Spanish-speaking, children between the ages of six and nineteen were admitted by direct application to the superintendent. A five dollar a week fee for incidentals was required of those able to pay; indigents were taken free of charge. By legislative provision there was no charge for board. In 1917 the institution was moved to its present location at 45th Street and Lamar Blvd, made possible by appropriations of the Thirty-fourth and Thirty-fifth legislatures for the erection of buildings on the campus donated by citizens of Austin.

Photographs documenting the Texas Blind, Deaf, and Orphan School from the Austin Files collection. The Texas Blind, Deaf, and Orphan School, a charity-sponsored institution for black children, was located on a hundred-acre tract on Bull Creek Road between 38th and 45th streets, about four miles northwest of the Austin business district. It was established as the Deaf, Dumb, and Blind Institute for Colored Youth in 1887 by the Eighteenth Legislature. A $50,000 appropriation was made to buy land and to construct appropriate buildings; the board of trustees included H. E. Shelley, J. T. Fulmore, and William M. Brown. Seventeen pupils and two teachers were present for the opening of the school on October 17, 1887. The initial campus consisted only of an eleven-room residence, but in 1888 a new two-story brick building was added to provide more classroom and dormitory space. In 1919 the school was placed under the jurisdiction of the newly created Board of Control. Various additions and renovations took place during the next several decades; by the 1940s the school had twelve brick buildings and one stone building, including dormitories, classrooms, hospital, superintendent's residence, and dining room. Instruction at the accredited high school emphasized training in trades and industries. Among the courses offered were manual labor, broom making, mattress making, shoemaking and repair, tailoring, cleaning and pressing, cooking, sewing, rug making, and other handicrafts. The hospital furnished surgical, medical, dental, and nursing services; specialists for eye, ear, nose, and throat ailments were employed part-time. Some poultry and farm products were raised each year for the home's own use. Texas School for the Deaf Administration Building Texas School for the Deaf Administration Building. Image available on the Internet and included in accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107. Texas School for the Deaf Historical Marker Texas School for the Deaf Historical Marker. Image available on the Internet and included in accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107. When the State Colored Orphans' Home was combined with the institute in 1943, the name of the facility was changed to Texas Blind, Deaf, and Orphan School. The school was moved to 601 Airport Boulevard, the former site of the Montopolis Drive-in Theater, in 1961, after the legislature appropriated $1.5 million for the construction of eleven buildings to accommodate the 1,208 students. The school was placed under the jurisdiction of the Texas Education Agency in 1965, and its name was changed to Texas Blind and Deaf School. It was combined with the Texas School for the Deaf later that year. The campus of the former Texas Blind and Deaf School served as the East Campus facility of the Texas School for the Deaf, and housed programs in early childhood and elementary education, as well as the department for multihandicapped deaf students. In 1989 the legislature appropriated money for the renovation of the School for the Deaf's South Campus, and plans were made to move all of the programs to the new facilities once the construction was completed. In the early 1990s no decision about the future use of the East Campus facility had been made.

Photographs documenting World War I from the Austin Files collection

Photographs documenting Austin Area Garden Center from the Austin Files collection. The Austin Area Garden Center is located at Zilker Botanical Garden, 2220 Barton Springs Rd., in Zilker Metropolitan Park

Photographs documenting World War II from the Austin Files collection

Media documenting official visits from celebrities and politicians from the Austin Files collection

Photographs documenting swimming from the Austin Files collection

Photographs documenting the Special Olympics from the Austin Files collection

Photographs documenting hardware stores from the Austin Files collection

Photographs documenting grocery stores from the Austin Files collection

Photographs documenting private schools from the Austin Files collection

Photographs documenting City of Austin council members from the Austin Files collection

Photographs documenting Lady Bird Lake, also known as Town Lake, from the Austin Files collection. Lady Bird Lake is a river-like reservoir on the Colorado River in Austin, Texas, United States. The City of Austin created the reservoir in 1960 as a cooling pond for a new city power plant. The lake, which has a surface area of 416 acres, is now used primarily for recreation and flood control.

Photographs documenting restaurants from the Austin Files collection

Photographs documenting the Boy Scouts of American in Austin from the Austin Files collection

Photographs documenting Austin businesses from the Austin Files collection

Photographs documenting Camp Swift from the Austin Files collection. Camp Swift began as a United States Army training base built in 1942. It is named after Major General Eben Swift. 2700 buildings were built during World War II, but none of those remain on the site today. At the end of the war, they were sold or donated and relocated. The gymnasium was relocated to Whitney Texas. It is still in use today by the school district. During World War II, German prisoners of war began arriving and at peak numbered 10,000. At the same time, the camp held 90,000 GIs, making it one of the largest army training and transshipment camps in Texas. The 10th Mountain Division trained at Camp Swift in 1944. The 2nd Infantry Division trained there mid 1945 to early 1946. The camp also trained nurses under battlefield conditions. The camp trained some 300,000 soldiers before the war ended. Camp Swift is currently owned by the Texas Army National Guard and acts as a training center for the National and State Guard, active armed forces, law enforcement, high school ROTC and the Civil Air Patrol. The camp is also the primary emergency staging area for Central Texas.

Photographs documenting caves in the Austin area from the Austin Files collection

Photographs documenting the Cedar Choppers in the Austin area from the Austin Files collection. The term cedar chopper applied to harvesters and their families, who moved from camp to camp for their work. Cedar chopping was a significant factor in the development of central Texas and its economy well into the twentieth century. It supported charcoal kilns, timber yards and camps.

Media documenting celebrations in Austin from the Austin Files collection

Photographs documenting the beer industry in Austin from the Austin Files collection

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