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Video documenting a 1976 Juneteenth celebration in Austin, Texas from the Austin Files collection

Group portrait of three young African American boys at the Emancipation Day Celebration, June 19, 1900, held in "Eastwoods Park" on East 24th Street

1900-06-19

Emancipation Day celebration, June 19, 1900 held in "East Woods" on East 24th Street. Mrs. Grace Murray Stephenson also kept a diary of the day's events which she sold to the San Francisco Chronicle.

1900-06-19

People and picnic tables under a tent in the park near "East Woods" on East 24th Street. Mrs. Grace Murray Stephenson kept a diary of the day's events, which she later sold to the San Francisco Chronicle which wrote a full-page feature on it.

1900-06-19

Barbecuing the meat at the Emancipation Day Celebration on June 19, 1900. The 1900 celebration was held in "East Woods" on East 24th St. near the home of the photographer. This photo and a "story" written by the photographer were printed in the San Francisco Chronicle.

1900-06-19

Flags and bunting greet the returned soldier at the Emancipation Day Juneteenth Celebration at Eastwoods Park, north of UT Campus, June 19, 1900.

1900-06-19

Older African American man in a white suit and leather gloves, June 19, 1900. He was the "Grand Marshall for over 50 years" at the Emancipation Day Juneteenth celebration

1900-06-19

African American man standing behind a wagon loaded with watermelons on June 19, 1900. "Typical watermelon salesman." The day's events were held at "East Woods" on East 24th St. Mrs. Stephensen kept a diary of the events, which she later sold to the San Francisco Chronicle.

1900-06-19

Eight men in suits with ceremonial swords on their hips, June 19, 1900. These were the "officers of the day" at the Emancipation Day Juneteenth celebration. The ceremony was held at East Woods park on East 24th Street. Mrs. Stephensen kept a diary of the day, which she later sold to the San Francisco Chronicle.

1900-06-19

Morris Givens Band and Negro National Guard at Juneteenth Celebration at Wheeler's Grove, June 19, 1900.

1900-06-19

Photographs documenting Eastwoods Park from the Austin Files collection. Eastwoods Park is a shady 9 acre neighborhood park that sits along Waller Creek, just north of the University of Texas. Prior to development as a city park in 1930, the site was referred to as Wheeler’s Grove. The site is historically significant for hosting one of the earliest Juneteenth celebrations in Austin in the latter part of the 19th century. Juneteenth is a holiday that commemorates June 19, 1865, the day that news of President Abraham Lincoln’s 1863 Emancipation Proclamation reached Texas. Juneteenth later became a time to celebrate African-American cultural traditions and the annual celebrations continue today in other parks in Austin. In March, 1929, nine acres of land on Waller Creek was purchased for $20,000 for the development of a park and playground. The playground was open by August, 1930, and a pool was opened by 1933. Eastwoods Park is used as a neighborhood park by the Eastwoods neighborhood and students from the University of Texas. The park was the original location of Austin's Eeyore's Birthday Party, an eclectic and uniquely Austin festival started by students at the University of Texas. The event is now held in Pease Park. Eastwoods Park was designed by the landscape architect, Jac Gubbles. Gubbles is well known as the chief landscape architect for the Texas Highway Department (THD) Landscape Division. It was Gubbles who is credited with the early beautification initiatives along Texas highways. Prior to his work with the THD, Gubbles restored the San Jacinto Battlefield to its original 1830s appearance and worked extensively on the Austin as a part of a $750,000 bond program to purchase land for boulevards and parks. Gubbles oversaw the acquisition of land along Shoal Creek, Plum Creek, and Zilker Park.

This tape contains video shot at the 1976 Juneteenth celebration held at Rosewood Park in Austin, Texas. The video was originally produced by George Wilkerson and Bill Jorn, but this tape contains footage edited together by Bruce Blackwell for broadcast on Austin Community Television in 1989. Featured in this Juneteenth celebration video are a speech by Rev. Cecil Williams in front of the Madison Cabin, gospel sung by the Gospel Inspirators of Austin, Texas (also in front of the Madison Cabin), and shots of the crowds and parade. The second half of the video presents ACC student Erma Humpries conducting interviews with ACC instructor Roland Hayes, parade participants, Miss Juneteenth contestants, and Austin City Mayor Pro Tem Jimmy Snell.

1976-06-19

Group portrait taken at Rosewood Park in 1930 that was featured in the City Manager Report published that year. Prior to the creation of Rosewood Park, African Americans founded Emancipation Park, a nearby parcel purchased in 1905 by the Negro Park Association, for use in civic events such as the annual Juneteenth celebration. But in 1938 Emancipation Park had been seized by the City for the site of Rosewood Courts, a federally funded public housing project, and Rosewood became one of the only green spaces available to Black Austinites. Over the next few decades Rosewood Park became the go-to recreational spot. By the end of the 1930s the park included a swimming pool, stone entry columns, a bandstand, and a sports field flanked by stone retaining walls - some of which was built by the Civil Works Administration. In 1944 a recreation center was constructed in the southwest corner of the park, and in the 1950s the pool was enlarged and a bathhouse and concession stand were constructed. Two decades later, a federal grant was used to expand the recreation center and in 1973 the Henry Green Madison Cabin (dating to the 1860s) was relocated from 11th Street to Rosewood Park. Each of these important spaces within Rosewood Park contributed to its recent designation as a Lone Star Legacy Park in February of 2019 by the Texas Recreation & Parks Society, and has a special place in the history of the park, and Austin as a whole.

1930

This short video focuses on the history and importance of Rosewood Courts, its location and connection to African American history in Austin.

2016

African American band at the Emancipation Day Juneteenth Celebration at "East Woods" on East 24th Street, June 19, 1900. Mrs. Grace Stephenson kept a diary on the day's events, which she later sold to the San Francisco Chronicle, which wrote a full-page feature on it.

1900-06-19

President Thos. J White and a major portion of annual Officers and Directors of the Organization, 1909. Emancipation Park was an effort to purchase private property where African-Americans could celebrate Juneteenth.

1909

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