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Date

Note on back of photo: "Sneed, Thomas Eskridge, 1832-1901. Mayor, 1857." Studio portrait of mature Thomas Eskridge Sneed. He wears a jacket and tie with a mustache for facial hair.

Note on back of photo: "Sneed, Thomas Eskridge, 1832-1901. Mayor, 1857." Studio portrait of mature Thomas Eskridge Sneed. He wears a jacket and tie with a mustache for facial hair.

Group portrait of the dedication of Reed Park on May 4, 1954. Identified individuals include Hugo Kuehne, Walter Seaholm, David K. Brace, Mrs. Fred Eby, Roberta Reed Crenshaw, Mrs. Charles Bailey-Casis and Charles McAden.

1954-05-04

Formal portrait of E. M. Pease, reproduced from an engraving. Elisha Marshall Pease (1812-1883) was born in Enfield, Hartford County, Connecticut, to Lorrain T. Pease and Sarah (Marshall) Pease. He was called "Marshall" by his family and is not known to have signed himself as anything but "E. M. Pease" and "Marshall"--never "Elisha." He studied at Westfield Academy (Mass.) until age fourteen or fifteen, after which he worked as a store clerk and then for the Hartford Post Office. He left Connecticut in 1834 and, after exploring the Midwest and making a trip to New Orleans, came to Texas in 1835. There he came to acquire financial security that he could not gain in New England. Pease settled in the Municipality of Mina (later renamed Bastrop) where he became involved in the early stages of the Texas Revolution. He fought in the first battle at Gonzales, and then he began service to the interim government and, later, that of the Republic of Texas. He wrote part of the Constitution of the Republic of Texas and served in several positions in the interim government. He settled in Brazoria at the invitation of John Austin Wharton, where he joined Wharton's law firm, and he was admitted to the Texas bar in 1837. He served in the first three terms of the Texas legislature after annexation. Pease ran unsuccessfully for governor in 1851, but he won two years later, and he and his family moved to Austin. He was governor for two terms (1853-1857), during which time his administration settled the debt remaining from the Texas Revolution, putting the state on a sound financial foundation for the first time. He persuaded the Legislature to establish a Permanent School Fund of two million dollars, but as much as he wanted public schools, they were not generally operational until after the Civil War. He encouraged railroad construction in the state and led the building campaign that resulted in construction of the Governor's Mansion, the General Land Office, and a new Capitol. He also led the establishment of state schools for the deaf and the blind, as well as the state "lunatic asylum." In 1859, Pease bought the home that James B. Shaw had built west of the City of Austin in 1854. With its surrounding farm and untouched acres, it became known as Woodlawn. The house was the prototype of the Governor's Mansion--both were built by Austin's "master builder," Abner H. Cook. Four generations of the Pease family lived there. Before, during, and after the Civil War, Pease was loyal to the Union, although he was an enslaver. He and his family remained in Austin during the War, lest they lose all their property, and he farmed with enslaved people at Woodlawn. Because he refused to swear loyalty to the Confederacy, he could not practice law during the War. During Reconstruction, he unsuccessfully ran for governor in 1866. The following year, he was appointed provisional governor by the U. S. Army command in charge of Texas. In 1869, he resigned over political differences. He continued to be involved in Texas politics and, in 1879, he was appointed United States Customs Collector, where he served two years. He co-founded a bank in Austin and was involved in civic improvements. Pease died suddenly in Lampasas and was buried in the family plot of the Austin City Cemetery, now Oakwood Cemetery.

undated

Group portrait of Mr. Henry Maerki, Mayor Tom Miller, and Mr. Borneman on May 29, 1938 at an open house for the Central Fire Station #1

1938-05-29

Alexander Penn Wooldridge

undated

Mayor Butler standing next to an Oldsmobile.

undated

Portrait of Austin mayor Benjamin F. Carter. He served as mayor from 1858-1859.

undated

Portrait of Ben F. Carter who was captain of the Tom Green Rifles (Company B, 4th Texas Regiment, Hood's Texas Brigade), also known as the City Light Infantry. Previously he was mayor of Austin, 1857-1859.

circa 1858

Lee Cooke portrait

undated

Formal portrait of Frank Cooksey.

1990

Portrait of Joseph Nalle, mayor of Austin from 1888-1889.

circa 1888

Portrait of Alexander Penn Wooldridge.

undated

Portrait of Alexander Penn Wooldridge. He wears a black suit with a white vest and bowtie.

undated

Portrait of Edwin Waller

undated

A half-length seated photographic portrait of Edwin Waller. His tie is undone.

circa 1870

Portrait of John S. "Rip" Ford, former Mayor of Austin.

undated

A formal head-and-shoulders portrait of Austin mayor Taylor Glass.

undated

Formal portrait of Austin Mayor John W. Glenn.

Portrait of Mayor Gus Garcia

undated

Portrait of Carole Keeton McClellan sitting at her mayor's desk. A nameplate is visible at the lower edge.

circa 1978

Carole Keeton McClellan with a small group of children from the Junior Helping Hand Home.

undated

Mayor Carole Keeton McClellan participates in Equal Rights Amendment walkathon. She wears a sash pinned with a button reading "ERA Yes."

circa 1979

Formal portrait of mayor Ron Mullen.

undated

Three-quarters view portrait of John Wesley Robertson. He has a long goatee, short hair and wears a jacket, vest, white shirt and small cravat. He was mayor of Austin from 1884 to 1887. The photo is cut to an oval shape.

undated

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