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On March 17, 2020, city orders prohibited social gatherings of 10 or more people and closed Austin’s bars and restaurant dining rooms in an effort to slow the coronavirus outbreak. In the wake of the order, famed Sixth Street quickly looked like a ghost town, with boarded-up bars and businesses.

2020-03-22

Shane Reilly, an Austin-based artist, began sticking flags in his front yard in May of 2020 to honor each Texan lost to the virus. He started the project as a way to encourage his neighbors to pay attention to the seriousness of the pandemic. The installation eventually became an impromptu memorial — and people began traveling from around the city to see it up close. Reilly said that the project had been difficult to keep up with. He had placed over 20,000 flags in the ground, but he regularly updated the sign that stands above the flags, noting the number of Texans who have died. From Shane “I still think that the idea of showing the numbers versus just saying numbers is a powerful message and a powerful reminder,” he said. “It also adds individuality to those that we’ve lost.”

2021

Color photograph of empty streets taken during the COVID-19 pandemic by Andrei Matei.

2020

HOPE Outdoor Gallery artists spray-painted murals on boarded-up Sixth Street bars to lift Austin's spirits during the COVID-19 pandemic. Mural by Kimie Fiores.

2020

Portrait photographs of Austinites wearing masks posted to Instagram and Facebook as part of the "Wear A Mask ATX Portrait Project"

2020

View of empty shelves at local grocery store during the COVID-19 pandemic when many essential supplies were in short supply.

2020

Shane Reilly, an Austin-based artist, began sticking flags in his front yard in May of 2020 to honor each Texan lost to the virus. He started the project as a way to encourage his neighbors to pay attention to the seriousness of the pandemic. The installation eventually became an impromptu memorial — and people began traveling from around the city to see it up close. Reilly said that the project had been difficult to keep up with. He had placed over 20,000 flags in the ground, but he regularly updated the sign that stands above the flags, noting the number of Texans who have died. From Shane “I still think that the idea of showing the numbers versus just saying numbers is a powerful message and a powerful reminder,” he said. “It also adds individuality to those that we’ve lost.”

2020

On March 17, 2020, city orders prohibited social gatherings of 10 or more people and closed Austin’s bars and restaurant dining rooms in an effort to slow the coronavirus outbreak. In the wake of the order, famed Sixth Street quickly looked like a ghost town, with boarded-up bars and businesses.

2020-03-22

Project abstract for upcoming book about Frank Smith and Ronnie Earle. Ronald Dale Earle (February 23, 1942 – April 5, 2020) was an American politician and judge who was, from January 1977 to January 2009, the District Attorney for Travis County, Texas. In the first year of his first term as DA, Earle faced the challenge of prosecuting Frank Smith, the ex-convict and head of a bail bond business.

2020

Shane Reilly, an Austin-based artist, began sticking flags in his front yard in May of 2020 to honor each Texan lost to the virus. He started the project as a way to encourage his neighbors to pay attention to the seriousness of the pandemic. The installation eventually became an impromptu memorial — and people began traveling from around the city to see it up close. Reilly said that the project had been difficult to keep up with. He had placed over 20,000 flags in the ground, but he regularly updated the sign that stands above the flags, noting the number of Texans who have died. From Shane “I still think that the idea of showing the numbers versus just saying numbers is a powerful message and a powerful reminder,” he said. “It also adds individuality to those that we’ve lost.”

2021

Social media posts created by Haley Elander as a response to COVID-19 from the series titled "A story of an inflatable friend Wacky during shelter in place."

2020

Portrait photographs of Austinites wearing masks posted to Instagram and Facebook as part of the "Wear A Mask ATX Portrait Project"

2020

Color photograph of empty Austin, Texas streets taken during the COVID-19 pandemic by Andrei Matei.

2020

Mixed media art created by Lauren Jahnke and inspired by the COVID-19 pandemic. "Description of Art Piece “Coronavirus 2020” by Lauren R. Jahnke [Acrylic paints and collage of newspaper articles and headlines on 12”x12” cardboard] I made this art piece in April 2020 from newspaper articles and headlines cut out from the Austin American-Statesman in March and April 2020, when it was getting overwhelming and surreal to see practically every newspaper article talking about some aspect of the coronavirus pandemic and the unprecedented response to it. I started seeing patterns and repeated words, and felt I needed to cut out some of the text to save for posterity. (The large file size of the two photos allows viewers to zoom in to read the text on the front and back of the piece.) I also kept seeing graphics of the virus itself, so wanted to paint stylized versions of the virus on top of the headlines. As an artist as well as a health policy researcher/writer, this piece ties together my interests and helped me to think about things in perspective while keeping my hands busy while home-bound. At this writing in May 2020, the pandemic still dominates the news and will for the foreseeable future, but things are starting to feel more normal in some ways, with fewer lines and shortages at the grocery stores for example, and as people learn to adapt. Despite this, we still have a long way to go in areas such as understanding more about COVID-19, developing effective treatments and vaccines, helping the unemployed and the economy, and healing the exposed political divides."

2020

Medical workers taking precautions with PPE at a COVID-19 testing facility in Austin, Texas.

2020

Black-and-white photograph of an empty Sixth Street taken during the COVID-19 pandemic.

2020

HOPE Outdoor Gallery artists spray-painted murals on boarded-up Sixth Street bars to lift Austin's spirits during the COVID-19 pandemic.

2020

Portrait of Reshmi Chowdhury, organizer for the Celebration of Love fundraiser. KOOP Radio's program "Passport to India" aired a concert called "Celebration of Love: A Civic Fundraiser for COVID-19" that was performed online on May 2. The musical performances in the concert featured six locally and internationally known South Asian-American vocalists and musicians - Babna Karim, Raka Bhaduri, Argha Guha, Chandan Zaman Ali, Pooja Paul Choudhury, Shubhro Banerjee, Reshmi Chowdhury. In this difficult time, the concert aimed to give a soothing musical experience, while raising funds for low income Asian Americans in Central Texas as well as the underprivileged people in Bangladesh. Reshmi Chowdhury organized and hosted the fundraiser, which was acknowledged by the Asian American Quality of Life (AAQoL) Commission and is being archived by the Austin History Center.

2020

Employee at Austin's Merit Coffee shop gives a poodle a hi-five during the COVID-19 pandemic.

2020

Closed for business on Sixth Street, where the threat of the coronavirus has reduced this storied thoroughfare to something akin to a ghost town.

2020-03-22

Child holding a rubber mallet, putting together a garden bed frame

2020

YouTube weblinks to performances from the Celebration of Love fundraising event during the COVID-19 pandemic

2020

"A typical day- we had a fundraiser on this Thursday and raised over $100 for the Annual MLK Celebration."

2020

Mother and child wearing matching cloth face masks during the COVID-19 pandemic

2020

Portrait of officer Ricardo Reza wearing a mask in his police cruiser during the COVID-19 pandemic.

2020

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